"The Descent of Man" by Vijay Seshadri


My failure to evolve has been causing me a lot of grief lately.
I can’t walk on my knuckles through the acres of shattered glass
     in the streets.
I get lost in the arcades. My feet stink at the soirees.
The hills have been bulldozed from whence cameth my help.
The halfway houses where I met my kind dreaming of flickering lights
     in the woods
are shuttered I don’t know why.
"Try," say the good people who bring me my food,
"to make your secret anguish your secret weapon.
Otherwise, your immortality will be
an exhibit in a vitrine at the local museum, a picture in a book.”
But I can’t get the hang of it. The heavy instructions fall from my hands.
It takes so long for the human to become a human!
He affrights civilizations with his cry. At his approach,
the mountains retreat. A great wind crashes the garden party.
Manipulate singly neither his consummation nor his despair
but the two together like curettes
and peel back the pitch-black integuments
to discover the penciled-in figure on the painted-over mural of time,
sitting on the sketch of a boulder below
his aching sunrise, his moody, disappointed sunset.

via poetrysociety - Read More.
69 notes

"The worst thing you can think about when you’re working is yourself."

Agnes Martin via Brain Pickings

theparisreview:

“The strange thing about imagery is that a great deal of it is subconscious, and sometimes it appears in a poem, and nobody knows wherefrom this emerged. But it is rooted, I am certain, in the poet’s subconscious life, often of his childhood, and that’s why I think it is decisive for a poet: the childhood that he has lived.”
George Seferis, born on this day in 1900.

theparisreview:

“The strange thing about imagery is that a great deal of it is subconscious, and sometimes it appears in a poem, and nobody knows wherefrom this emerged. But it is rooted, I am certain, in the poet’s subconscious life, often of his childhood, and that’s why I think it is decisive for a poet: the childhood that he has lived.”

George Seferis, born on this day in 1900.

184 notes

"Novels remind us that the hard questions matter, they always have, and that we can’t ignore them just because we’re comfortable, well-fed, sheltered, and secure. Maybe those same comforts, which give us time and leisure enough to read novels in the first place, are the very reason why we need them so badly. A great novel is always felt as a kind of gift, and here’s the strange thing: these gifts are heartbreaks we wouldn’t suffer, tears we wouldn’t shed, agonies we wouldn’t undergo, if we simply left the books alone and did something else with our time."

Brian Ted Jones (via millionsmillions)

184 notes

"I reached that odd point when you are no longer young, and yet you’re still not old. You become a kind of centaur: half the person you used to be, half somebody else; that point when there is more you do not care about and less and less you do - you are in no man’s land; you keep moving, but not because you will get anywhere."

Benjamin Prado from Not Only Fire (via gravellyrun)

(via mythologyofblue)

227 notes

Dear sweet, naive 24 year old me:things will just get better and better. via Letters of Note

Dear sweet, naive 24 year old me:
things will just get better and better. 
via Letters of Note

0 notes

"The first thing an unpublished author should remember is that no one asked him to write in the first place. With this firmly in mind, he has no right to become discouraged just because other people are being published."

John Farrar (via writetothestars)

(Source: writingquotes, via writetothestars)

498 notes

"Those of us with a mind for winter—a love of the season—still find something romantic in these games, for they commemorate, however remotely, a central nineteenth-century Romantic theme: the discovery of the paradox of speed in winter. This gives a certain fascination to even the smaller winter sports. Basically, where the summer sports show all the varieties of human action—throwing, jumping, running, swimming, swimming the same way as someone else at the same time—the winter ones share a single theme: gravity and frozen water, and what can be made of them together."

Adam Gopnik on the Sochi Games: http://nyr.kr/LFkqe4 (via newyorker)

(Source: newyorker.com, via newyorker)

"I think that there is a sharp contrast for most people between life at university, where they meet lots of people, and the moment when they enter the workforce, when they basically no longer meet anyone. Life becomes dull. So as a result people get married to have a personal life. I could elaborate but I think everyone understands."

 Michel Houellebecq, The Art of Fiction No. 206

Theodore: Am I in this because I’m not strong enough for a real relationship?Amy: Is it not a real relationship?Theodore: I don’t know. What do you think?Amy: I don’t know. I’m not in it. But you know what, I can over think everything and find a million ways to doubt myself. And since Charles left I’ve been really thinking about that part of myself and, I’ve just come to realize that, we’re only here briefly. And while I’m here, I wanna allow myself joy. So fuck it.HerDir. Spike Jonze

Theodore: Am I in this because I’m not strong enough for a real relationship?
Amy: Is it not a real relationship?
Theodore: I don’t know. What do you think?
Amy: I don’t know. I’m not in it. But you know what, I can over think everything and find a million ways to doubt myself. And since Charles left I’ve been really thinking about that part of myself and, I’ve just come to realize that, we’re only here briefly. And while I’m here, I wanna allow myself joy. So fuck it.

Her
Dir. Spike Jonze